making a home

one of the things i’m looking forward to in colorado is making a home for our family.

i currently have three things hanging on walls in my house and they are all in odd locations because that’s where the nail or screw just happened to already be and that got me thinking…

when we moved to thailand we assumed we’d be here a long time.  a really long time, but we’ve never had a timeline.  we didn’t really know how long we’d be here when we arrived and each year came with either the promise of another year or the threat that we could be moving.  that makes it hard to create a home.  i’ve never put a nail into a wall here.  if something happens to be hung it’s because there was already a nail in place to hold it.  for christmas decorations we used temporary tape type things.  nothing permanent.  nothing that left a hole that would require filling in when we left.  we’ve lived in three houses here and i’ve painted one room.  the kitchen in the current house.  but it still doesn’t feel like my kitchen.  it’s just a borrowed kitchen i’ve painted yellow.

a while ago (while i was cooking christmas dinner) michael and i had a fight over a ladle.  i was cooking and i commented that i would be glad to not see this particular ladle once we moved.  he said that we should take it with us, a new ladle would cost money that we didn’t need to spend.  his statement might be true, but my only thought was that this ladle belongs in a kitchen that is in a house that’s never been our home (i also thought ladles are cheap and if i want a new ladle i’ll get a new ladle.)  i think it might have been the first time we had to think about our return being more than just a move.  while a lot of the steps are the same as the moves we’ve made in the past – making to do lists, packing boxes, arranging logistics… all that fun stuff – there’s something different on the other end.  something that i’m not totally ready to embrace, but something that i know will be good.

i’m looking forward to making a home.  i’m going to paint walls (lots of walls, but not all the walls) and i’m going to hang pictures.

 

 

 

 

making plans, dragging feet

time marches on.  it just won’t stop and i’d like it to.  i’d like to pull back on the reigns and say, “whoa” and have time stop.  and wait until i’m ready for it to move forward, but it won’t.  it just won’t.

right now i count the days by the thens.  michael’s in indonesia right now.  he’s been gone for almost 2 weeks and has another week to go.  then he’s home for a little less than a week.  then he’s in africa for approximately 2 weeks.  then he’ll be home for close to a week.  then he’s in america for 4 days.  (yes, he’ll spend almost as much time traveling for that trip as he will actually be there and he’ll spend way more time recovering from that trip than he will be there.)  then he’s home.  and for some reason that’s when time really starts for me.  time starts in april.  not sure what my mind thinks happens between now and then (mid Feb and early April), but for some reason it doesn’t feel real.  it doesn’t feel like progress.  about the same time michael returns from america family starts arriving.  aly (i cannot wait to see her, it’s been so long!!!), her boyfriend (we’ve never met him), my mom, and my aunt will all come to chiang mai.  and i’m crossing my fingers and hoping against hope that chan will also be coming (that feels like a bit of a long shot, but also not impossible).  we’ll have two weeks of family and tourist stuff and songkran and time not stopping.  overshadowing everything is the weight of “this is it”.  this is good bye.  this is our last smokey season (miserable, but we’ll miss it).  our last hot season (miserable, but we’ll miss it).  our last songkran (not always miserable and something i will definitely miss).  and i think what makes it harder is that it doesn’t feel like there are any firsts to come.  it isn’t our first time to live in america.  it’s not our first time to live in colorado.  it’s not even our first time to live in the house we’ll be returning to.  it feels like too much.  but it can’t be stopped.

so, we make plans.  there are the we need to sort this plans, the we need to do this plans – the logistical stuff that comes with moving.  those are sort of easy (easy to see, not necessarily easy to do.)  but then there are the we have to do this plans.  and they aren’t the same for all of us.  michael is ticking off some of his through work.  i know with each trip he makes he’s saying goodbyes.  and it’s not easy for him.   the hardest plan of all is the final how do we leave chiang mai plan.   figuring out how to do goodbye isn’t easy.

it’s much easier to say late july is forever away.

Bike Riding along the Tiber

It was our last day in Rome. Everyone elses’ flights left about 4 hours before ours so Sam and I opted to be responsible for getting ourselves to the airport so we could enjoy one last morning.

We decided to rent bikes and ride along the Tiber River.  We couldn’t have asked for a more beautiful morning or a better way to end our trip.

Plus, I got one more opportunity to hone my selfie skills.

Pretty sure that selfies while bicycle riding is like pro level.

There was also time for one last gelato before turning in our bicycles.

We grabbed sandwiches for the road and began our journey back to Thailand.

Cooking School – Italy

One of the first things Sam and I thought about when we heard about the trip to Rome was cooking school, so I set about arranging it.  My mom came along, too.  Lots of food was eaten by all.

We started off with bruschette.  We didn’t make it, but we did see how easy it is to make.  Pretty sure the purpose of this course was to fill us up just enough that we wouldn’t be tempted to eat what we were cooking as we were cooking it.

After the bruschette we were put to work making broccolo romanesco (Roman Broccoli).

Learning some chef skills and finishing up the Roman Broccoli

After we got the broccoli going we went ahead and made desert.  Tiramisu.  It’s no bake, but does require some time to set.

Next up was the Saltimbocca all Romana.  Veal with proprosciutto and basil.

The only thing left to make was Le Fettuccine al sugo di pomodoro & basilico or Fettuccine with Tomato and Basil Sauce.

After we finished cooking it was time to enjoy it.  We enjoyed a fantastic meal.  A giant meal.  Starting with a very simple antipasto.   We didn’t cook this one, no cooking really required, but we did eat it up.

We haven’t tried any of these recipes since we’ve gotten home, but have plans to try them all.

Trevi Fountain and the Spanish Steps

I am not exactly sure of what we did the morning of the 5th day.  The only pictures I took were of our suitcases

that's lots of suitcases for 6 people

that’s lots of suitcases for 6 people

some questionable gelato

and Ronald McDonald

That night we walked to the Trevi Fountain and the Spanish Steps.  We went a bit of a roundabout way to get to the Trevi Fountain.  We finally broke down and asked for directions.  The very nice guy said, “Trevi Fountain?  There’s a little problem, but you are close.”  He gave us directions.  We understood the directions and we found the fountain.

Pretty sure the “little problem” was that it was closed.  I can only imagine it’s really, really awesome when it is actually doing fountain stuff.  Oh well, on to the Spanish Steps.

We might have gone a bit of a roundabout way to get to the Spanish Steps, but that was okay.  We found them and that was our goal.

They, too, were closed.  But our step count for the day was impressive.

The Coliseum and The Forum

Sam and I just returned from 10 days in Rome.  We were there to celebrate my parents’ 50th wedding anniversary.  The first day in Rome was a bit of a wash.  It was a travel, find the apartment and just get situated kind of day.

The start of day 2 – dad, Mike (my twin brother), mom, Sam, and me. Behind the camera is Esther, my brother’s girlfriend.

Day 2 in Rome involved walking to the Vatican Museum, St. Peters, and the Bridge of Angels before heading to the Vittorio Emanuele II Monument.  I also managed to fit in a bit of selfie practice.  Sam appreciated it.

When we got to the Vittorio Emanuele II Monument we rode this elevator up to the roof.

From the roof you have an amazing view of the city of Rome.  It’s an excellent place to practice your panoramic photo taking skills.

Our next stop was lunch and then off to the Coliseum and the Forum.  The Coliseum was amazing.  We put in our earbuds and listened to Rick Steves’ guide us through the Coliseum (my dad had strongly suggested that we download all of Rick Steves’ Rome podcasts).

After the Coliseum we regrouped at the Arc de Triomphe.  You might notice my selfie skills are improving while Sam’s tolerance of selfies seems to be flagging.

Next up the Forum.  The Forum was probably my favorite site.  It helped that the weather was cool and there were no crowds.  We were guided through by Rick Steves.

Days 1 & 2 in Rome done and we only thought we were exhausted.

Summer with Aly

We left New Zealand for America.  We were going as a family of 4 but we’d be returning to Thailand as a family of 3.  Well I’d be returning alone and 2 weeks later Michael and Sam would follow.  Aly would stay in America.

I’m not going to catch up to all that happened while we were in America, but here are some photos of the stuff we did with Aly this summer.